Shirin Barghi

Shirin Barghi is an Iranian journalist, photographer and soon-to-be graduate of New York University. She has more than three years of journalism experience in Tehran, where she studied and worked before moving to New York in 2010. She is currently working on her M.A. thesis on journalism education in post-revolutionary Iran.


Latest
Murdoch's Egypt

Murdoch’s Egypt

In a piece published closely after the military ouster of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, the Wall Street Journal’s editorial board argued: “Egyptians would be lucky if their new ruling generals turn out to be in the mold of Chile’s Augusto Pinochet, who took over power amid chaos but hired free-market reformers and midwifed a transition to democracy.” More»

I Am Nasrine

I Am Nasrine

In her award-winning film I Am Nasrine, Iranian-American director Tina Gharavi sheds light on the inexorable rise of post-9/11 xenophobia in the United Kingdom. Set in Tehran and northeast England, the film tells the story of teenage siblings Ali and Nasrine, who are sent off to England in hope of securing a better future. More»

Recasting Islamic Sexual Norms

Recasting Islamic Sexual Norms

It was a simple black-and-white shot of two veiled women tangled up in an intimate embrace, their lips only an inch apart. Some hailed the photo as groundbreaking for addressing issues of gender and sexuality in Islam. Others criticized it as deeply Orientalist, if not defiant of Islamic values. More»

Open Letter to Mona Eltahawy

Open Letter to Mona Eltahawy

Perhaps it is not my place to comment on your über-feminist “Why Do They Hate US?” eureka moment, since it almost exclusively focuses on the Arab world. You have every right to roll your eyes and think: “there goes the Iranian again, crashing our party and sticking her nose where it doesn’t belong.” More»

The Shahs of Sunset

The Shahs of Sunset

We Iranians have a lot on our plates these days: the looming shadow of war, crippling international sanctions that are starving our economy and making life miserable, a despotic theocratic regime that controls every aspect of our lives. And, to add insult to injury, American reality shows that ridicule our culture and make us look like idiots. More»